January 2013 Book Signing Lectures: Ozer & Johnson

Both events are free and open to the public.

Washington, D.C.: Streets and Statues, Walking in the Steps of History

Mark Ozer: Washington, D.C.: Streets and Statues, Walking in the Steps of History

Wednesday, January 9 at noon in Ketchum Hall of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Building at 200 Maryland Avenue, NE, on Capitol Hill, author Mark N. Ozer will discuss his newest book, Washington, D.C.: Streets and Statues, Walking in the Steps of History.  Who are the persons whose names are part of our daily lives in Washington? Why are they there? When did they appear? For what reason? Mark Ozer’s new book deals with these and other questions as it examines the design of the city to reflect its purpose as the capital city of a great nation and of its subsequent growth as a world power.

Dr. Richard Randall, executive secretary emeritus of the United States Board on Geographic Names, has praised Washington, D.C.: Streets and Statues: “People interested in the national capital –tourists, students, recent or long time residents—can all learn the fascinating story of the country’s history as expressed in its street names and statues. This book provides a broad perspective about the history and design of Washington DC that is both highly interesting and accurate.”

Copies of the book will be available for purchase and autographing by the author.

 

In the Shadow of the United States Capitol: Congressional Cemetery and the Memory of the Nation

Abby & Ronald Johnson: In the Shadow of the United States Capitol: Congressional Cemetery and the Memory of the Nation

Wednesday, January 16 at noon in Ketchum Hall of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Building at 200 Maryland Avenue, NE, on Capitol Hill, authors Abby Arthur Johnson and Ronald Maberry Johnson will discuss their new book, In the Shadow of the United States Capitol: Congressional Cemetery and the Memory of the Nation. The authors, former recipients of a United States Capitol Historical Society fellowship, explore the multiple ways in which Congressional Cemetery has been positioned for some two hundred years in “the shadow” of the U.S. Capitol.  The narrative proceeds chronologically, discussing the burial ground during three periods: a) The antebellum years; b) The years from the end of the Civil War to approximately 1970, when the site progressively deteriorated; c) The period from the early 1970s to 2007, when both public and private organizations worked to preserve the physical site and the memory of what it has been and continues to represent.

The chronology is enlivened by the stories of many of the fascinating individuals buried in Congressional Cemetery.  Reviewer Howard Gillette remarked that “It’s stunning to realize what a who’s who exists in that space.”

Copies of the book will be available for purchase and autographing by the authors.