Insperia

Loading...

‹ Lectures + Webinars Table-of-Contents


USCHS: 2021 Lunch Bites + More

September 14, 2021

Lunch Bites: “Who is Frederick Law Olmsted, and What is the Big Deal?”

The U.S. Capitol Historical Society has joined the Olmsted200 organization to celebrate the bicentennial of the birth of the man whose design for the U.S. Capitol Grounds is considered a masterpiece. We all know that Frederick Law Olmsted’s plan and development of Central Park in New York City led the concept and development of parks for the people, by the people, and of the people. But why is his legacy being celebrated with a 2022 conference in Korea? Why is there a display about his legacy in Liverpool, England? Why was his travel book about Texas widely purchased in England? How did his work lead to the creation of the American Red Cross, as well as the National Park Service? Why was he recognized as the guiding spirit of the most successful World’s Fair in history?

August 24, 2021

Lunch Bites: A Webinar with Former Rep. Connie Morella on the 101st Anniversary of the Women’s Vote

The U.S. Capitol Historical Society hosted a webinar to celebrate the 101st anniversary of women earning the right to vote featuring Ambassador and former U.S. Rep. Connie Morella. She discussed the century that has passed since women first fought for—and earned—the right to vote, and where we stand today on achieving full gender equality in politics and in our society. Morella also discussed the growing divide in our politics and what it will take for our Congress, and nation, to come together.


August 10, 2021

William Costin: “A tribute to worth by his Friends”

On the occasion of his untimely death in 1842, the businessmen of Capitol Hill commissioned a very striking lithograph portrait of William Costin, entitled, “A tribute to worth by his Friends.” In the background of the drawing is the Bank of Washington, the first and most prominent bank in the capital.

Why did these businessmen feel it necessary to attest to Costin’s “worth”? He was apparently Martha Custis Washington’s grandson, so why was he not included in family history? Obviously, it is because his mother was enslaved. But if so, why does he not appear in the inventories of Custis family property? And how did a tea set in California trigger acknowledgement of Costin’s place in Mount Vernon history?

During this webinar, USCHS Public Historian Steve Livengood answered these questions and told the remarkable story of this intriguing portrait and the remarkable man whose “worth” was celebrated in the drawing preserved in the Library of Congress.


July 27, 2021

Lunch Bites: The We, The People Civics Education Hub

Throughout much of the past, challenging year, the U.S. Capitol Historical Society and its partners in the We, the People Constitution Tour Consortium have developed an online civics education hub. Now operational, this free and open resource is available for teachers, students, and lifelong learners across the country and around the world. Join us on Tuesday, July 27th at Noon EDT for a special Lunch Bites exploring the hub’s videos, lesson plans, and more. The event is free and open to the public; registration is required.


July 13, 2021

Lunch Bites: Cox Corridors Part 3

Located on the ground floor of the House Wing of the U.S. Capitol, the Cox Corridors contain elaborate murals depicting historic scenes along three central themes: Capitol History, the Great Experiment, and Westward Expansion. In this webinar, which was hosted on Tuesday, July 13th at Noon EDT, USCHS Chief Guide Steve Livengood concludes his exploration of the design and painting of the Westward Expansion Corridor by the artist Allyn Cox – and the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s role in commissioning the works!


May 18, 2021

Lunch Bites: Cox Corridors Part 2.5

USCHS Chief Guide Steve Livengood continued his discussion of the design and painting of the Great Experiment Hall by the artist Allyn Cox –and the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s role in commissioning the works! Located on the ground floor of the House Wing of the U.S. Capitol, the Cox Corridors contain elaborate murals depicting historic scenes along three central themes: Capitol History, the Great Experiment, and Westward Expansion.


May 4, 2021

Lunch Bites: The Cox Corridors, Part Two

Located on the ground floor of the House Wing of the U.S. Capitol, the Cox Corridors contain elaborate murals depicting historic scenes along three central themes: Capitol History, the Great Experiment, and Westward Expansion. USCHS Chief Guide Steve Livengood discusses the design and painting of the Great Experiment Hall by the artist Allyn Cox — and the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s role in commissioning the works!


April 20, 2021

Lunch Bites: The Filibuster with Dr. Sarah Binder

While few Senate rules have the distinction of being a household name, the Filibuster is one of the most iconic — and hotly debated — facets of American government. From its creation as an historical accident under Vice President Aaron Burr to its rise to Hollywood fame, the rule changed in both public opinion and implementation. On Tuesday, April 20th, 2021, we were joined by Dr. Sarah Binder, Senior Fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution and Professor of Political Science at George Washington University, and David Hawkings, a longtime Capitol Hill correspondent and the founding editor of “The Fulcrum,” for a discussion on the origins and evolutions of Washington’s favorite parliamentary procedure.


April 6, 2021

Lunch Bites: The Cox Corridors, Part One

Located on the ground floor of the House Wing of the U.S. Capitol, the Cox Corridors contain elaborate murals depicting historic scenes along three central themes: Capitol History, the Great Experiment, and Westward Expansion. Watch USCHS Chief Guide Steve Livengood discuss the design and painting of the Hall of Capitols and Great Experiment Hall by the artist Allyn Cox — and the U.S. Capitol Historical Society’s role in commissioning the works!


March 23, 2021

Lunch Bites: A “State of the Union” Mystery

While the past years may have looked a little different, the President’s State of the Union Address is always an exciting time at the Capitol. In the upcoming installment of the Fina Mendoza Mystery Series, the 10-year-old daughter of a congressman is sitting in the House Gallery when a mysterious bird poops on the head of the president during the State of the Union address. Can Fina outsmart the Secret Service, the Capitol Police, and most of Capitol Hill and find that bird? On Tuesday, March 23, 2021, we welcomed author Kitty Felde for a discussion about her upcoming book and work to make civic education fun through novels.


January 26, 2021

Lunch Bites: Congressional Invocations

Featuring: Howard Mortman.