January Brown Bag Lecture: James Lancel McElhinney on Artist Seth Eastman

Fort Knox by Seth Eastman

The U.S. Capitol Historical Society is pleased to announce that James Lancel McElhinney will present a lunchtime lecture on Wednesday, January 17, 2018. Rethinking Seth Eastman: A Contemporary Perspective will focus on Eastman’s final works—a series of paintings depicting the Principal Fortifications of the United States, now housed in the United States Capitol.

WEATHER UPDATE: This event will take place as planned, regardless of weather conditions. We are located near two metro stations: Union Station on the red line and Capitol South on the blue, orange, and silver lines.

McElhinney's view of West Point from the Garrison, from his book Hudson Highlands

McElhinney’s view of West Point from the Garrison, from his book Hudson Highlands (courtesy the artist)

 

Seth Eastman's depictin of Fort Knox in Maine (courtesy the Architect of the Capitol)

Seth Eastman’s depiction of Fort Knox in Maine (courtesy the Architect of the Capitol)

 

The presentation is free and open to the public, although PRE-REGISTRATION is requested. The lecture begins at noon on January 17 and will be held in Ketchum Hall of the VFW Building at 200 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20002.

PRE-REGISTER HERE

James Lancel McElhinney

James Lancel McElhinney (courtesy the artist)

McElhinney is an independent scholar, visual artist, author, and oral historian. He earned an MFA in painting from Yale and has received numerous fellowships and grants, including a 2017 Pollock Krasner Grant and a grant from National Endowment for the Arts. His most recent book, Hudson Highlands, was published in November 2017; it is a suite of archival prints inspired by expeditionary artists such as John-James Audubon, William Guy Wall, George Catlin, and Seth Eastman. McElhinney regards his paintings as interventions, encountering the landschaft as a palimpsest of simultaneous narratives; terrain organized by memory and desire; shaped by human activity and conditioned by topography, climate, and the forces of nature.